My friends Dan and Josh join me to discuss some of the questions and confusions that arise when OCD joins the party. How can friends and family relate to what obsessive-compulsives are going through? When is it OCD, and when is your friend just being a jerk? And how does OCD affect romantic relationships?

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Fear and Loathing on Election Eve

October 15, 2014

The central problem with American democracy – and it is by no means restricted to our democracy – is that you have to pretend to be stupid to get elected. (It doesn’t hurt to actually be stupid.)

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Are There Upsides to OCD?

October 15, 2014

Does OCD sharpen our attention to detail and make us more productive? In this episode, I discuss some of the popular myths surrounding OCD’s alleged benefits.

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Energy and Exhaustion

October 15, 2014

The pace of modern life can be draining; add OCD to the mix, and it can be positively overwhelming. In order to create a schedule that was more manageable for me – including time for OCD management, self-care, and rest – I moved overseas, slashed my expenses, and decided to work much less.

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Judo, Not a Fistfight

October 15, 2014

In this episode, I discuss the confusion that can arise when we employ multiple treatment methods. Should we expect ourselves to know exactly how to respond to OCD every time? Or is that expectation just a form of OCD-driven perfectionism?

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Lost in Thought

October 15, 2014

For many people, the phrase ‘lost in thought’ suggests something vaguely pleasant – a slow, dreamy, afternoon-ish kind of feeling. For obsessive-compulsives, getting lost in thought can be more painful – a tornado funnel in which we lose track of the OCD management techniques we most need.

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The Brain’s Stupidity and the Mind’s Wisdom

October 13, 2014

According to Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz, OCD generates “deceptive brain messages” that cause us to lose touch with our true selves. In my case, the disease does so by erasing the difference between the meaningful and the mundane. By OCD’s lights, no experience is ever trivial; everything is high-stakes and high-intensity.

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